Tips & Tricks

9C WORLD ISSUES


Look at the image and predict what this class will be about.

1

 

For the third year (1)_______ a row, millennials (2)________ participated in the World Economic Forum’s Global Shapers Survey 2017 believe climate change is the (3) _______ serious issue affecting the world today.

Nearly half (48.8%) of the survey participants chose climate change (4)_______ their top concern, and 78.1% said they would be willing to change their lifestyle to protect the environment.

Survey respondents were also in near unequivocal agreement (5)___________ the cause of climate change. Over 91% of respondents answered “agree” and “strongly agree” with the statement “science has proven that humans are responsible (6)___________ climate change.”

(LINE 11) Despite the dire state of the world today — and the stereotype that millennials’ are selfish and apathetic — the generation aged 18 to 35 cares deeply (7)__________ global issues, and they’re determined to tackle them.

Below are (8) ________________ top-10 most concerning world issues, according to millennials.

 

Text Comprehension

  1. What did the author mean by ´´the dire state ´´ in line 11?
  2.  Who are millennials?
  3. What is a good synonym for ´apathetic´?
  4. Why do some people worry more about this issue than others?

ANSWER KEY

  1. in
  2.  who
  3.  most
  4.  as
  5. over
  6. for
  7. about
  8. the

 

WHICH ARE THE MOST SERIOUS ISSUES?

  1. UNEMPLOYMENT
  2. SECURITY
  3. LACK OF EDUCATION
  4. FOOD & WATER
  5. CORRUPTION
  6. RELIGIOUS  CONFLICTS
  7. POVERTY
  8. INEQUALITY
  9. WARS
  10. CLIMATE CHANGE

read the article below (click on the link) and compare with your answers

https://t.ly/nj0qL

9C

9C page 2

EXTRA PRACTICE

YOU ARE A BANK MANAGER WHO RECEIVED THE FOLLOWING EMAIL:

email

WRITE YOUR CLIENT AN ANSWER USING AN APPROPRIATE STYLE OF WRITING.

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PART II

DISCUSS THE FOLLOWING:

A) PENSION REFORM

B) COFFEE

C) VENEZUELA

D)  HYDROELECTRICITY

E) unemployment rate hitting an all time high in 2017 at 13.6%

F) IT  has two nuclear reactors generating about 3% of its electricity

1

2

3

FINISH THE TASK BELOW UNDER 10 MINUTES AND PLAY A KAHOOT OF YOUR CHOICE. IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO, YOU MUST DO A LONG READING TASK IN CLASS.

6

HOMEWORK – READING TASK

t.ly/w6xDx

READING CAE

Difficulty levelC1 / advanced

This page will let you practise for the Certificate in Advanced English exam (from Cambridge English). This is the format of the seventh part of the reading and use of English section.

You are going to read four different opinions from leading scientists about the future of fuel. For questions 1-10, choose from the writers A-D. The writers may be chosen more than once.
A
Howard Bloom, Author:

Even though most people are convinced that peak oil has already passed, to me, peak oil is just a hypothesis. There is a theory that carbon molecules can be found in interstellar gas clouds, comets and in space ice, and if this is the case, our planet could ooze oil for ever. And even if we stay earthbound, those who say we have raped the planet of all its resources are wrong. There’s a huge stock of raw materials we haven’t yet learned to use. There are bacteria two miles beneath our feet which can turn solid granite into food. If bacteria can do it, surely we creatures with brains can do it better. As far as the near future of energy is concerned, I believe the most promising alternative fuels are biofuels, such as ethanol. It’s an alcohol made from waste products such as the bark of trees, woodchips, and other ‘waste materials’. And that’s not the only waste that can create energy. My friend in the biomass industry is perfecting an energy-generation plant which can run on human waste. We produce that in vast quantities, and it’s already gathered in centralised locations.

B
Michael Lardelli, Lecturer in Genetics at The University of Adelaide

Nothing exists on this planet without energy. It enables flowers and people to grow and we need it to mine minerals, extract oil or cut wood and then to process these into finished goods. So the most fundamental definition of money is as a mechanism to allow the exchange and allocation of different forms of energy. Recently, people have been using more energy than ever before. Until 2005 it was possible to expand our energy use to meet this demand. However, since 2005 oil supply has been in decline, and at the same time, and as a direct result of this, the world’s economy has been unable to expand, leading to global recession. With the world’s energy and the profitability of energy production in decline at the same time, the net energy available to support activities other than energy procurement will decrease. We could increase energy production by diverting a large proportion of our remaining oil energy into building nuclear power stations and investing in renewable forms of energy. However, this is very unlikely to happen in democratic nations, because it would require huge, voluntary reductions in living standards. Consequently, the world economy will continue to contract as oil production declines. With energy in decline, it will be impossible for everyone in the world to become wealthier. One person’s increased wealth can only come at the expense of another person’s worsened poverty.

C
Jeroen van der Veer, chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell

People are understandably worried about a future of growing energy shortages, rising prices and international conflict for supplies. These fears are not without foundation. With continued economic growth, the world’s energy needs could increase by 50% in the next 25 years. However, I do not believe that the world is running out of energy. Fossil fuels will be able to meet growing demand for a long time in the future. Taking unconventional resources into account, we are not even close to peak oil. The priority for oil companies is to improve efficiency, by increasing the amount of oil recovered from reservoirs. At present, just over a third is recovered. We can also improve the technology to control reservoir processes and improve oil flow. However, these projects are costly, complex and technically demanding, and they depend on experienced people, so it is essential to encourage young people to take up a technical career in the energy industry. Meanwhile, alternative forms of energy need to be made economically viable. International energy companies have the capability, the experience and the commercial drive to work towards solving the energy problem so they will play a key role. But it is not as simple as merely making scientific advances and developing new tools; the challenge is to deliver the technology to people worldwide. Companies will need to share knowledge and use their ideas effectively.

D
Craig Severance, blogger

What will it take to end our oil addiction? It’s time we moved on to something else. Not only are world oil supplies running out, but what oil is still left is proving very dirty to obtain. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred precisely because the easy-to-obtain oil is already tapped. If we don’t kick oil now, we will see more disasters as oil companies move to the Arctic offshore and clear more forests. The cheap petroleum is gone; from now on, we will pay steadily more and more for our oil — not just in dollars, but in the biological systems that sustain life on this planet. The only solution is to get on with what we will have to do anyway – end our dependence on it! There are many instances in which oil need not be used at all. Heat and electricity can be produced in a multitude of other ways, such as solar power or natural gas. The biggest challenge is the oil that is used in transportation. That doesn’t mean the transportation of goods worldwide, it’s the day-to-day moving around of people. It means we have to change what we drive. The good news is that it’s possible. There are a wide range of fuel efficient cars on offer, and the number of all-electric plug-in cars is set to increase. For long distance travel and freight, the solution to this is to look to rail. An electrified railway would not be reliant upon oil, but could be powered by solar, geothermal, hydro, and wind sources. There is a long way to go, but actions we take now to kick our oil addiction can help us adapt to a world of shrinking oil supplies.

Which writer:

1. believes oil will be available for many more years 
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D: Craig Severance

2. believes that from now on, less oil is available
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D; Hannah

3. believes there are ways to obtain energy that we have not yet discovered
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D: Craig Severance

4. sees a great potential in natural fuels
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D: Craig Severance

5. believes the fuel crisis will cause the poor to become poorer
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D: Craig Severance

6. sees energy and the economy as intrinsically linked
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D: Craig Severance

7. believes we should reduce our dependance on oil immediately
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D: Craig Severance

8. believes that people need to be attracted to working in the energy industry
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D: Craig Severance

9. believes that it is unlikely that governments will invest a lot of money into alternative energy
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D: Craig Severance

10. believes that future oil recovery will lead to more environmental disasters
Select
A: Howard Bloom
B: Michael Lardelli
C: Jeroen van der Veer
D: Craig Severance

ANSWER KEY

1-C

2-B

3-A

4-A

5-B

6-B

7-D

8-C

9-B

10-D

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