Tips & Tricks

7A PART II


 

LISTENING f2f aD

DG

SPEAKING

WORK IN PAIRS

RV

DO YOU KNOW A FAMOUS KILLER?

DID HE GET AWAY?

WRITING

What __________________ (IDENTITY) someone __________ a serial killer is a specific _______________(BEHAVE): __________________(TO HAVE) killed two or more victims in at least two incidents (https://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/serial-murder). No other personality or ______________________ (BEHAVE) characteristic places all serial killers ________________ a criminological category. Although some subgroups have core behaviors in common, there is actually a great deal of variation in this population, from a range of motives, backgrounds, ages, and behaviors, to differences in physiology, mental state, and perceptions that influence reasoning and decisions.

Among the approaches, I use in my college course on serial murder to address nature vs. nurture is a flexible theory proposed ____________ neuropsychologist Debra Niehoff. She has reviewed the most significant literature about the interplay of genes and the environment in the development of violent behavior, and she finds that each factor modifies the other throughout a person’s lifespan. “The brain perceives and interprets,” she says, “but the biochemical alterations triggered by experience continually update this circuit, shaping worldview ___________ accordance with conditions” (2003).

This gets more complex when we add _________________________ (INDIVIDUAL). Each person _____________ (UNIQUE) processes a given situation, they process it differently ____________ different ages and in different circumstances, and some gravitate toward violence. This can be defensive violence or aggressive, psychotic or psychopathic, reactive or predatory, to name some possibilities.

ANSWER KEY

What identifies someone as a serial killer is a specific behavior: having killed two or more victims in at least two incidents (https://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/serial-murder). No other personality or behavioral characteristic places all serial killers into a criminological category. Although some subgroups have core behaviors in common, there is actually a great deal of variation in this population, from a range of motives, backgrounds, ages, and behaviors, to differences in physiology, mental state, and perceptions that influence reasoning and decisions.

Among the approaches, I use in my college course on serial murder to address nature vs. nurture is a flexible theory proposed by neuropsychologist Debra Niehoff. She has reviewed the most significant literature about the interplay of genes and the environment in the development of violent behavior, and she finds that each factor modifies the other throughout a person’s lifespan. “The brain perceives and interprets,” she says, “but the biochemical alterations triggered by experience continually update this circuitry, shaping worldview in accordance with conditions” (2003).

This gets more complex when we add individuality. Each person uniquely processes a given situation, they process it differently at different ages and in different circumstances, and some gravitate toward violence. This can be defensive violence or aggressive, psychotic or psychopathic, reactive or predatory, to name some possibilities.

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